Monday, November 10, 2014

Writing in 140: Color Your Story's World

One quick yet important way to infuse your story with meaning (emotionally, mentally, physically, even spiritually) is through color. Research shows that color can affect mood and human behavior, and those in marketing often use color in branding products.

Multicolor Card Stock Image by gubgib with FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Whether you consider color at the start or end of writing a book, it’s a good idea to at least ask what color represents your…

…Setting’s personality? What colors within the setting create this personality?

…Character’s personality? What colors in a character’s dress and home create this personality?

…Conflict? Think about your protagonist and consider contrasting colors to represent your antagonist(s).


Don’t go overboard in using color; a little goes a long way. Don’t be cliché in your use of color; allow color to work in the context of YOUR story.



When painting your story’s world, how important is color?


Shon Bacon is an author, editor, and educator, whose biggest joys are writing and helping others develop their craft. She has published both creatively and academically and interviews women writers on her popular blog ChickLitGurrl: high on LATTES & WRITING. You can learn more about Shon's writings at her author website, and you can get information about her editorial services at CLG Entertainment.

11 comments :

  1. It is important to use color well. Too often we throw in the typical 16 count crayon colors as a reference (red dress). You have to be careful when using the full 64 or 120 count. Not everyone knows what aubergine is. Here's a fun link for inspiration: http://www.colourlovers.com/web/blog/2008/04/22/all-120-crayon-names-color-codes-and-fun-facts

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    1. Will definitely have to check out this link, Diana. Thanks for providing it!

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  2. I'm not sure how much color impacts my stories ... but I sure would like to see a little more green resulting from them.

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  3. I was just reading some stuff about this. Very interesting.

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    1. I do, too, Susan. Plan to do more reading up on it. :-)

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  4. Color engages one of the senses and helps to paint a mental picture. The color of the sky, the leaves, the ground, a room, even clothing sets the mood. Used wisely and with insight, it brings depth to both scene and character.

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  5. I love color and agree with your post that a little color goes a long way in a story. Thanks much

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  6. I do like knowing the color of things ... not so much people.

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  7. Cool article! I used to be a practicing artist in the 90's & early 2000's. Color is special to me...when I open a new venture I always look for a powerful yet happy color. Good to see another persons perspective on color

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  8. Color does make a difference in a story. I like the idea of a character having a signature color.

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The Blood-Red Pencil is a blog focusing on editing and writing advice. Some of our contributors are editors, some are authors, and some are writing sheep. Yes, sheep.

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