Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Inside the Editor's Den: Fave Works to Edit

In part three of our September series Inside the Editor’s Den, we ask our BRP editors the following questions:

What types of work do you typically edit? Is there a favorite type or genre?





Linda Lane
Website | Denver Editor | FB
Linda Lane - I prefer fiction, although I have edited some non-fiction and educational pieces.










Shonell Bacon
Website | FB | Tw
Shonell Bacon - I have edited so many types of writing over the years. From erotica, romance, and mysteries to fantasy, sci-fi, and literary. It helps that I actually like to read these genres, too, so that I have an idea about how these types of stories are typically developed. I also edit academic works (research articles, theses, dissertations, etc.) and non-fiction. I have to say that these days I love editing non-fiction, especially faith-based self-help works. Every book of this type that I’ve edited has taught me something valuable.



Maryann Miller
Website | FB | Tw
Maryann Miller - As a freelance editor, I prefer to work with mysteries, women’s novels, young adult, and romance. I am not fond of science fiction or fantasy or erotica, so I don’t consider myself qualified to edit in those genres. Although I did edit a science fiction book recently for a friend of mine. We are in a critique group together, and he appreciates my editing expertise. That was an interesting experiment for both of us. I learned a little more about sci-fi, and he learned a little more about making the story stronger.



Elle Carter Neal
Website | FB | Tw
Elle Carter Neal - I have a good deal of practice in editing Fantasy, and that is my favourite genre. I will take on other genres, except for Horror, Romance, or anything religious or spiritual.








A Writer’s Takeaway


What you probably noticed in reading our editors' responses is that there are a variety of genres in need of editing, and not every editor will edit the same genres (or all genres). This is very important for the writer to know. Each of our BRP editors knows the conventions of grammar and spelling and mechanics and formatting. They also know about story development. But some of us explicitly tell you that we don't do particular genres. If you have a romance novel you need editing, you would want to have an editor who has experience editing romances because there are elements to romance novels that aren't present in other genres. Same for if you're writing sci-fi or fantasy or any other genre. If you ask an editor about the types of writing she edits, and she replies, "I do any and all types," be worried. Especially if she doesn't voraciously read all those types and if she doesn't have references of clients who can speak to her editing abilities in those types of genres.

10 comments :

  1. This is great information, especially for new writers hoping to self-publish. Editing in one genre does not make one an expert in editing all genres. Finding a specialist is worth the research time.

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    1. So true, Patricia. The time taken to research the right editor for you pays off so much in the long run.

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  2. Patricia makes a great point, as does Shon: even the best editors usually limit their work to certain genres because each genre has its own requirements. Fiction and non-fiction, for example, often require different style manuals or style sheets, as do various publishers.

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Linda! :-)

      And by limiting the genres you edit, an editor can hone her talents in those genres.

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  3. I think it's important for an editor to enjoy what they are doing, and if they don't like a certain genre, how much heart and soul can they put into the job? Something else to think about.

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    1. That is certainly true for fiction. I really think we need to understand the nuances of different genres to be able to do a good edit.

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  4. Although I would add one thing. It depends on the KIND of editor. A line editor or proofreader probably can do fine without being a huge fan of the genre. A developmental editor better enjoy the genre to do a good job.

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    1. Totally agree with that, Dani, and this is so important to note, so thanks for that!

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  5. I remember hiring my first editor. After he did a great job on three books, I realized that he edited non-fiction. He knew nothing about point of view. He still did a great job on the book, but at the time I didn't know about POV either. So, yeah, be careful who you get to edit your books.

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    Replies
    1. That was some good luck on your part, Polly! That could have ended up not so great.

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The Blood-Red Pencil is a blog focusing on editing and writing advice. Some of our contributors are editors, some are authors, and some are writing sheep. Yes, sheep.

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