Friday, May 29, 2015

BSP


BSP. Not sure what it is, then head over to the BookShop Blog for a good article about it - or at least one related to authors. Wikipedia hasn't caught up with us yet.

This June, we're all about BSP for our resident bloggers and you'll get to learn much more about them and their publications. Join us throughout the month.

Don't forget to connect with the Blood-Red Pencil on Twitter and Facebook too! We're going to practice BSP everywhere.

How about you, readers? Are you into it or would you rather not do it? Leave us a comment.

10 comments :

  1. I'm in the middle of the most BSP I've ever BSP'd about. The Kindle Scout program, which I have to admit, reminds me of how much I dislike BSP. As an indie writer, it's up to us to promote ourselves, but begging for votes, because that's what it is, is the worst.

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  2. I'm right behind Polly on this one. BSP does not come naturally for me, and I often fail to take advantage of opportunities that might have resulted in a book sale. I'm looking forward to an attitude adjustment with this month's posts. :-)

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  3. The way some promotion is done reminds me of the over-eager sales person in a store, and I have never been comfortable with the blatant approach. The dictionary definition of blatant is: noisy especially in a vulgar or offensive manner : clamorous
    2
    : completely obvious, conspicuous, or obtrusive especially in a crass or offensive manner : brazen

    I remember in the late 70s and early 80s when the romance genre took off like a wildfire and authors were told to go out and promote. The term BSP came into vogue then, and too many authors took it literally.

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  4. I just read the excellent article by Diane Plumley that you linked to, Dani. I do hope everyone hops over to read it clear to the end. It's is long, but well worth the time.

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  5. I think most writers feel really awkward about it. But if no one ever hears of your book, they can't buy it. The most important tips are 1) target our aurdience. Make sure you are promoting in a place that is receptive, like fan of genre groups, etc). 2) Make sure it is allowed on the sites you post on. 3) Tell us what the story is about! Too often I see titles or covers or news of a release, but the base line is what is your logline/your premise? That has to be intriguing. 4) Add a link to your book on Amazon, etc. so they can go directly to buy it or look inside to investigate further.

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  6. I think most writers feel really awkward about it. But if no one ever hears of your book, they can't buy it. The most important tips are 1) target our aurdience. Make sure you are promoting in a place that is receptive, like fan of genre groups, etc). 2) Make sure it is allowed on the sites you post on. 3) Tell us what the story is about! Too often I see titles or covers or news of a release, but the base line is what is your logline/your premise? That has to be intriguing. 4) Add a link to your book on Amazon, etc. so they can go directly to buy it or look inside to investigate further.

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  7. As the world's worst BSPer, I'm actually a little jealous of those who are good at it ... I wish I was more willing to exchange a little dignity for cash. Okay, let me be more honest ... it's less about dignity and more about sloth ... but I'm still jealous.

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  8. It's hard to balance BSP so you do just enough without aggravating people. I probably do too little for myself, but I'm never sure where to draw the line.

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  9. It's often easier to promote someone else's books than our own!

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    Replies
    1. I agree, Morgan, and I think we are not alone in this.

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The Blood-Red Pencil is a blog focusing on editing and writing advice. Some of our contributors are editors, some are authors, and some are writing sheep. Yes, sheep.

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