Friday, December 12, 2014

The Buck Stops Here

This post was first published here on April 27, 2012.

At least we hope it stops here — because that’s the plan. So how do we get from hope to plan to book sales? Where’s the marketing goose that lays the golden eggs?

Last December, a very interesting piece appeared in the Wall Street Journal. After having her manuscript rejected by several publishers and more than 100 literary agents, first-time author Darcie Chan took matters into her own hands. At the time the article was written, she had sold over 400,000 books. When any unknown writer creates this kind of success, we need to sit up and take notice. What is she doing that we are not? Check out the article at the link below, and then tell us what you think. How could you adapt her marketing strategy to your book?

This is a very short post because I really want you to read this article. It could make a huge difference in the success of your books — as well as the size of your bank account.

Linda Lane and her editing team mentor and encourage writers at all phases of the writing process. To learn more about what they do, please visit them at DenverEditor.com.

16 comments :

  1. Great story about Darcie. I applaud her and her tenacity. And I have to smile that NOW her book is a great success, and she did all the work, the powers that be want to scoop her up!

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  2. Thanks for the link to the article, Linda. The main thing that I gleaned from reading it is that Darcie spent some money on some ads, which is something many writers don't do. It is interesting that of late I have read advice from marketing experts who are saying buying ads is not the best way to reach potential readers. Hmmmm....

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  3. Very interesting. Does make one wonder what direct to go in these days.

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  4. Thanks for bringing our attention to this interesting and informative article, Linda! It's always great to hear about the success of another indie author!

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  5. Honestly, I don't know whether to laugh or cry ... part of me ... the part that admires the creative process and lauds the hard work of promotion wants to give Darcie a great big kudo for her success ... the other part, the darker, ego-driven, victim-oriented, why-do-others-seem-to-have-all-the-luck whiner wants to strangle her. Sheeeesh ... it tough being an indie author.

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  6. The message I gathered from the article was "think outside the box." This cliché is great advice in many cases, as is another: Don't take no for an answer.

    Maryann, I don't know about advertising. Maybe it matters how and where one promotes one's work. Advertising and promoting are very similar in nature; however, the application may be somewhat different.

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  7. Christopher, thanks again for the chuckle. You dare to say the things that some of us don't dare to say. LOL The key is to turn the negative thoughts into positive ones. Luck can come any day if one keeps writing and doing what he or she can do to market.

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  8. I hear a lot about posting on Facebook and tweeting on Twitter to boost book sales. As a person who does neither, I have to wonder if, indeed, there is something to these things. Now we have Pinterest, and non-techies like me shudder at the very suggestion of using yet another unfamiliar tool. Yet, others have enjoyed great success by utilizing them. Adjusting the mindset to embrace such technological wonders indicates that thinking outside the box may be easier than acting outside the box.

    You're so right, LD Masterson, when you note the confusion about which path is most likely to lead to success.

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  9. Quite interesting. I'm at a loss too.

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  10. This was a wonderful article and completely inspiring! Thank you for sharing. :) Have a great weekend.

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  11. Looks like Ms. Chan caught lightning in a bottle ... kinda like the woman sitting next to me at the Double Buck slots last week who hit for $4,000 ... dang it ... why didn't I pick that machine?

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    1. Might I suggest that one is a game of chance while the other is a game of dedication, hard work, and the willingness/ability to invest some dollars. Oh, wait, the game of chance requires dollars, too. Or is it quarters? Always enjoy your comments, Christopher! :-)

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  12. The article about Ms. Chan was well worth another read. One key to her success was targeted advertising and being able to spend money to make money.

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    1. Sort of goes back to the cliché that it takes money to make money.

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  13. At the end of 2014, things really haven't changed much, except Indy has more credibility. There are still those that sell wildly and then go on to traditional contracts, but the bigger question has become - why bother if you are making millions on your own?

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  14. I agree. The profit per book sale for an indie often far exceeds the royalties paid by traditional publishers.

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The Blood-Red Pencil is a blog focusing on editing and writing advice. Some of our contributors are editors, some are authors, and some are writing sheep. Yes, sheep.

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