Tuesday, January 3, 2012

What's Your Answer Is Back!

We had such a great response to the What's Your Answer feature when it was first introduced, we're bringing it back.

In case you've forgotten, here's how it works. I ask some questions. You pick one or more of them and give your answer(s) in the comment section. By the way, if you choose to answer one, you're welcome to expand on your answer. If you pick more, pretend you're somewhere like Twitter and make your answers brief. (No, we won't count the characters, but you get the drift.)

You may also include a website or blog URL at the end of your comment

Here Are Today's Questions And My Answers:
Question:
Do You Have a Publisher or Do You Self-Publish? Why?

Answer:
I started out with a small publisher, but now I self-publish. I love the freedom and the time-saving aspects.

Question:
Do You Read Books That Are Self-Published?

Answer:
Yes, I'll read any book that appeals to me, as long as it has a good storyline and is well told.

Question:
Amazon Has the Kindle Direct Publishing Select Program Where Authors Can Allow Their Books to Be Given Away for Free To Prime Members, as long as the author gives Amazon exclusive rights during three month increments. Is that program a good thing?

Answer:
If you have a lot of books and can spare some, or want to publicize one that starts a series, it might be good for publicity, to hook readers. Be careful you don't offer the book(s) anywhere else during that period, or Amazon will ban you from publishing all of your kindle books.

Now It's Your Turn. Pick a Question (or more) and Give Your Answer In the Comment Section.
------------------------------------------

Forever Young: Blessing or Curse
Is On Kindle & Smashwords
Blog Book Tour Stop Here on Tuesday, Jan., 10, 2012 Topic: Why Would Anyone Do Such a Thing?
Morgan Mandel is a past president of Chicago-North RWA,
was the Library Liaison for MWMWA, is an
active blogger and networker.

Her personal blog: http://morganmandel.blogspot.com/
Find all of Morgan's books at Amazon & Smashwords.com


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31 comments :

  1. Do You Read Books That Are Self-Published?

    Yes, I like to support self-published authors. However, I apply the same criteria as with traditionally published books: I read the first few pages and if it doesn't hold my interest, I give it a miss. Also, if I have to battle through too many typos and grammatical errors, I also tend to lose interest.

    Elle
    HearWriteNow & Blood-Red Pencil

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh, you're welcome ... I'm honored to be interviewed.

    #1: I'm an indie.

    #2: Sure, why not? Indies are people, too.

    #3: No idea ... but I'll try anything.

    No, no ... thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I read and review books by self-published authors. Some of the books are really great and I am six time self-published author. Some of the books that I have been honored to read and review are quite good and some are better than those of well-known authors. I review the books for content and plot line. I do know that some have grammar errors but if these errors do not interfere with the storyline, I tend to overlook them. I think we need to support self-published authors and give them more recognition. Fran

    ReplyDelete
  4. So far, it seems people are open to self-publishing. Maybe the tide is turning. We'll have to see if any comments come in against it.

    Morgan Mandel
    http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have not self published, but not opposed to it, just not sure I am ready, although I have a children's book that I think needs to be out there.
    I will read any good story regardless of who published it.
    I would consider a freebie as well, it would depend on the subject.
    Thanks for the post today.

    Terri
    Author The Cancer Prayer Book

    ReplyDelete
  6. I self-publish, but have had short stories traditionally published. I like learning the how-to of self-publishing, enjoy the creative process and control it gives me to produce something that's all mine ( with the help of a great editor) and like that I can earn money and build an audience while also trying to duel track traditional publishing as well.
    And yes, I read self-published work..
    David DeLee
    A Cold Wind - a Grace deHaviland novella

    ReplyDelete
  7. Do you read books that are self-published?

    Yes, I have a few books on my shelf that are self-published. My criteria for purchasing any book involves topic/genre and whether or not it's well written. I've also edited a number of self-published authors that I would gladly recommend to anyone looking for a good read.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Do I read self-published books? Yes and no. Yes, if they are well-written, engaging, and grammatically acceptable. The occasional typo is understandable, but an obvious lack of competent editing turns me off to both the book and the author.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I think most readers are in agreement that a poorly written book, whether traditionally published, or self published, is a turn-off.

    Morgan Mandel
    http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  10. Yes, I read books by self-published authors. I like the wider variety of stories that self-publishing offers readers. I think it's an exciting time to be a reader and writer.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'll read books by self published authors, sure. I've branched out from traditional publishing into that world myself. And with sampling, I don't buy them if I don't like them. Same goes for traditionally published books.

    As for the KDP Select program -- I don't like the 'exclusivity' feature, even though I make most of my money from Amazon sales. I'm a Nook owner, and feel slighted if people choose to make their books unavailable to me.

    Terry
    Terry's Place
    Romance with a Twist--of Mystery

    ReplyDelete
  12. Do You Have a Publisher or Do You Self-Publish? Why?

    I will be self-publishing at least one thing this year. I am planning to seek an agent for my first novel and see what happens.

    http://www.girlseeksplace.wordpress.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. Question:
    Do You Have a Publisher or Do You Self-Publish? Why?

    Answer:
    I have 12 traditionally published books, but now I am self-publishing. Given the current publishing climate (harder to sell books, lower advances, contracts that try to grab all rights, long publishing times), self-publishing seemed a better option in the long run. I wouldn't turn down a traditional contract for my children's books (written as Chris Eboch) since children's books are still largely dependent on industry reviews and school/library sales, but it would have to be a very good contract to persuade me to give up rights to my adult romantic suspense novels (written as Kris Bock).

    Question:
    Do You Read Books That Are Self-Published?

    Answer:
    Yes, I've tried a few. I look more carefully at reviews, though.

    Question:
    Amazon Has the Kindle Direct Publishing Select Program ...

    Answer:
    I'm waiting to see how other authors do with it. I have just published my second romantic suspense novel, so I don't think it's yet worth taking one of those off the general market. You make very good points, though.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Do You Have a Publisher or Do You Self-Publish? Why?

    At this point I have only one published book, and it is self-published. The book is Christian non-fiction, and it quickly became apparent that the conventional publishing industry would require a large existing platform, which I did not have. So, I decided to go the self-publishing route.

    I have learned a lot in the process, and have been pleased, overall, with how things have gone.

    Marketing is pretty challenging, however, I expect it would have been challenging either way.

    Writing and publishing are hobbies, for me, not my full-time employment. The self-publishing allows me the freedom to set my own work pace, which is a necessity.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Do you read books that are self-published? You bet I do! Many great novels have been overlooked by traditional publishers if they feel they aren't "marketable" enough for them, not based on content at all. I agree with Elle that they must be scrupulously edited and done well.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Yes, as one reader pointed out, you can do both, go traditional and indie, but it does depend on your contract with the traditional publisher. You need to be very careful if you travel that route.

    Morgan Mandel
    http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  17. I write, read, and publish indie books, and review indie books in print media. My first 17 books (1 fiction anthology, 16 non-fiction technical) were published by major mainstream houses. I now have 4 novels and a short-fiction collection indie published. I am a strong believer in independent publishing but absolutely deplore the poor production values and inadequate editing of so many books. I'll give a new book a break, but if the SPUG errors pile up, I'll bail without hesitation. I have a Kindle full of titles started but too painful to finish.

    The new KDP Select program looks like another money maker for Amazon. Not that I am knocking the big Aunt Ammi in the Cloud. Amazon makes it possible for indie writers like me to succeed. That said, they sure know how to milk a cash cow for every last drop.

    --Larry Constantine (author of The Rosen Singularity)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Do you self-publish? Yes, and I have three small to medium press publishers. One small press for my romances, one for my mysteries, and another for a hybrid book. My self-pubbed book is a previous release, Seeing Red, and it has had a lovely rebirth through self-publishing. I have several other titles I hope to bring out later this year with my company, Muddle House Publishing. Thanks for asking! Maggie

    ReplyDelete
  19. I'm with Elle. I love to support indie authors, but hold them to a pretty strict standard. The writing has to be of top quality as well as the editing. Like Larry, I have a number of books in my Kindle that I started and abandoned because of poor quality of writing and/or editing.

    As for the KDP program at Amazon, I am trying it with all of my indie books, and the publisher who did my short story collection and my YA novel also enrolled those. Not sure if I will stick with it for the long haul, though. There are so many other readers who don't have Kindles. On the other hand, my sales to those outlets were miniscule compared to what I sold on Amazon. Hard decision to make.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Question:
    Do You Have a Publisher or Do You Self-Publish? Why?

    Answer:
    I have 5 self-published books. I love the freedom of working on my books when I want and retaining all the rights. I have looked at some publishing contracts and for what you have to give away it just doesn't seem right. I agree though, that all self-published books need an excellent editor to be able to make it out there. I thank mine almost daily as she is relentless about making sure my work is topnotch!

    Question:
    Do You Read Books That Are Self-Published?

    Answer:
    I do, but I have to admit I try them out as ebooks so I can download the sample and see if the writing and editing are worth it.

    Question:
    Amazon Has the Kindle Direct Publishing Select Program ...

    Answer:
    I happen to love the the regular Kindle Direct Publishing .. I think this new thing they have going is trying to make your work exclusive on their sight and keep you from listing it with other ebook publishing places. Since I have an ipod I find that I can have the Kindle App, the Nook App, and the iBooks App so have the best of all three worlds like most Apple users would. Over the last few years I have gotten some good sales out of the Kindle and hope that it picks up in the new year as I get better at marketing my newer books.

    Annay Dawson
    www.annaydawson.com

    ReplyDelete
  21. I self-publish my own novels, and I read self-published novels..when they come highly recommended, the same criteria I used for traditionally published authors. I also predict that these distinctions/discussions will soon be moot.

    ReplyDelete
  22. L.J., I really hope you're right!

    Morgan Mandel
    http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  23. I read self-published novels just like I read paper novels, and suspect all the chatter about indie novels being badly produced is unwarranted. Yes, I've deleted a few from my Kindle that were awful, but also dumped traditionally published books that were just as badly written and/or produced. The so-called gatekeepers aren't gods (altho some of them seem to think so) and can promote garbage as well as anyone. For myself, I'm going indie and have an editor, a cover designer and a formatter--going indie doesn't have to mean going dumb.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Do I have a publisher or do I self publish? For me there is no "or." I do both. I meet more and authors who do both also. I would rather have a publisher because (1 there is so much work involved in self-publishing (2
    there is a second pair of eyes looking over my manuscript with a publisher so there is a second chance to catch and correct any errors and 3) although self-publishing has lost it's stigma, a publisher putting time, effort and money into a book suggests that the publisher believes in the quality of the book.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I like that saying of Eileen's, "Going indie doesn't have to mean going dumb."

    And Warren also has some good points. It doesn't hurt to straddle both sides of the fence if you can and reap the rewards!

    Morgan Mandel
    http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  26. Do You Read Books That Are Self-Published?

    Yes. Self-publishing has always been the traditional model in my industry. For us, the new model is commercial publishing. There is a trade off. Quality of information isn't so great with commercial publishing; self published authors are better but then there are have oversights with their work too -mostly attitudes etc. There did not used to be a deprecatory attitude toward self publishing in my industry because it was the only way to do it. It is changing these days; young people like "pretty" (commercial) works. They aren't informed enough to know whether the content is any good tho

    ReplyDelete
  27. I haven't as yet self-published, but I know how difficult it is to get traditionally published. So I certainly would read self-published books.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I've been indie since 2003 and yes I read indie, but I check for excerpts first. They do need to hold the standards readers expect and I cringe when it looks like authors just threw them out there before bothering to learn the craft.

    As for KDP, I don't buy anything from Amazon, so if a book is only available from them, I won't read it. Many are starting to feel the same. Monopoly is not good business practice.

    As an author, especially as an indie author, exclusivity is shooting yourself in the foot. I do well at BN.com and at Kobo and with so many experts saying to get them in as many places as you can, being exclusive is a bad move. Readers will go where your books are if you pull their interest. If authors refuse to play that game, the game will be over and readers will win.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I've had several publishers during my career. Now, I'm beginning to indie publish the books for which I have regained the rights. I plan to self-publish some books for the first time, but I will also continue to use traditional publishing. I like the combination.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Do You Read Books That Are Self-Published? Yes i read such books, these are my favorite books.
    Actual Tests

    ReplyDelete

The Blood-Red Pencil is a blog focusing on editing and writing advice. Some of our contributors are editors, some are authors, and some are writing sheep. Yes, sheep.

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